#16

62D _ConaREss, \ HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. { Document 3d Session. , No. 1386.

YOUNGS BAY AND RIVER, OREG.

LETTER

FROM

THE SECRETARY OF WAR,

TRANSMITTING,

WITH A LETTER FROM THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, REPORT ON PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION OF YOUNGS BAY AND RIVER, OREG.

FEBRUARY 11, 1913.—Referred to the Committee on Rivers and Harbors and ordered to be printed, with illustration.

War DEPARTMENT, Washington, February 10, 1913. Sir: I have the honor to transmit herewith a letter from the Chief of Engineers, United States Army, dated 6th instant, together with copy of a report from Maj. J. F. McIndoe, Corps of Engineers, dated December 6, 1912, on preliminary examination of Youngs Bay and River, Oreg., made by fii in compliance with the provisions of the river and harbor act approved July 25, 1912.

Very respectfully,

Henry L. Stimson, Secretary of War.

The SPEAKER OF THE House OF REPRESENTATIVES.

War DEPARTMENT, OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, Washington, February 6, 1913. From: The Chief of Engineers. To: The Secretary of War. é Subject: Preliminary examination of Youngs Bay and River, Oreg. 1. There is submitted herewith, for transmission to Congress, report dated December 6, 1912, by Maj. J. F. McIndoe, Corps of Engineers, on preliminary examination of Youngs Bay and River, Oreg., called tor by the river and harbor act approved July 25, 1912.

2 YOUNGS BAY AND RIVER, OREG.

2. Youngs River rises in the northwestern part of Oregon and flows in a northwesterly direction for a distance of about 20 miles, empty- ing into Youngs Bay, which is on the Columbia River, about 9 miles above its mouth. About 6 miles above the bay the Klaskanine joms Youngs River. The head of navigation on the KJaskanine branch is at the small town of Olney, and on the Youngs River branch navigation practically ends at the log booms located about one-half mile above the forks. Any vessel which can cross the ocean bar of the Columbia River can reach the mouth of this bay. Thence at low water 9 feet can be carried to the head of the bay and 4 feet to the forks of the river and 3 feet toOlney. Below the fork the channel depths vary from 4 to 37 feet, and the range of tide over this section is about 7 feet.

3. The district officer states that only one boat is now regularly engaged in carrying general freight and passengers on the river, this being a gasoline launch about 50 feet long and drawing about 44 feet. This boat makes one trip a day from Astoria to Olney and return, and her traffic is reported to amount to about 1,200 tons per annum. Occasionally a stern-wheel boat takes in a load of hay for use on the dairy ranches, which occupy the Jand from which the timber has been removed. The only other boats which enter Youngs River are the towboats engaged in bringing out log rafts. While the system- atic development of the shores has been planned by local interests, there is little or no evidence of the execution of these plans, and no offers of cooperation in the work of improvement have been made by these interests. The navigation fapilities available appear to be adequate for the present and prospective demands of commerce, and the district officer expresses the opinion that the improvement of the locality is not worthy of being undertaken by the General Govern- ment at this time. The division engineer concurs in this opinion.

4. This report has been referred, as required by law, to the Board of Engineers for Rivers and Harbors, and attention is invited to the board’s accompanying report of January 14, 1913, concurring with the views of the district officer and the division engineer.

5. After due consideration of the above-mentioned reports I concur in general with the views of the district officer, the division engineer, and the Board of Engineers for Rivers and Harbors, and therefore in carrying out the instructions of Congress I report that the improvement by the United States of Youngs Bay and River, Oreg., in the manner apparently desired by the interests concerned, as described in the reports herewith, is not deemed advisable at the present time.

; W. -. Brey, Chief of Engineers, U. S. Army.

YOUNGS BAY AND RIVER, OREG. 3

REPORT OF THE BOARD OF ENGINEERS FOR RIVERS AND HARBORS.

(Third indorsement.]

Boarp or ENGINEERS FoR Rivers anv Harpors, ; January 14, 1918. To the Carer oF EnGinrErRs, Unirep Srares ARMY.

1. Youngs Bay is located on the Oregon shore of the Columbia River, 9 miles from its mouth, adjacent to the city of Astoria. Youngs River empties into the bay. About 6 miles from the mouth the river is joined by the Klaskanine, its principal tributary. The small town of Olney, located about 14 miles above the forks, on the Klaskanine, is the head of navigation on that stream, and the Bremner Logging Co.’s booms, about one-half mile above the forks, is the head of navigation on Youngs River. The available channel depth at low water in the bay is about 9 feet and in the river 3 feet, the range of tide being about 7 feet in the bay and 6 feet in the river at Olney. :

2. The principal source of commerce is in the timber adjacent to these streams and, after its removal, in dairy products. One boat drawing about 44 feet operates regularly between Astoria and Olney, and it is estimated carries about 1,200 tons of freight. Other boats tow out log rafts. There are no mills on the bay or on the rivers. Sailing vessels use the upper bay to some extent for anchorage. The improvement desired 1s said to be a channel 25 feet deep at low tide through the bay for a distance of about 24 miles from deep water in Columbia River. The district officer expresses the opinion, in which the division engineer concurs, that the existing channel in Youngs Bay and River is ample for present and prospective commerce, and any further improvement of the locality is not worthy of being undertaken by the General Government at this time.

3. Interested parties were advised of the unfavorable report of

the district officer and given an opportunity of submitting their | views to the board, and one communication has been received and given consideration. : 4. From the facts presented, it appears there is no commerce present or prospective, that can not be reasonably well accommo- dated on the present depth in Youngs Bay and River. There are no aiemrtial or mining industries to create a large commerce, and there is no apparent need of better facilities than now exist. The board therefore concurs with the district officer and the division engineer in reporting that in its opinion it is not advisable for the United States to undertake the improvement of Youngs Bay and River at this time.

5. In compliance with law, the board reports that there are no questions of terminal facilities, waterpower or other related subjects which could be coordinated with the suggested improvement tn such manner as to render the work advisable in the interests of

commerce and navigation.

For the board: Wm. T. Rosset,

Colonel, Corps of Engineers, Senior Member of the Board.

4 YOUNGS BAY AND RIVER, OREG.

PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION OF YOUNGS BAY AND RIVER, OREG.

Unirep SraTes ENGINEER OFFICE, Portland, Oreg., December 6, 1912.

From: Maj. J. F. McIndoe. To: The Chief of Engineers (through the division engineer, North

Pacific Division).

Subject: Preliminary examination of Youngs Bay and River, Oreg.

In compliance with department letters of August 3 and September 24, 1912, the following report is submitted on the preliminary exami- nation of Youngs Bay and River, Oreg., provided for in the river and harbor act approved July 25, 1912. Sas

Youngs Bay is located on the Oregon shore of the Columbia River, about 9 miles from its mouth. It is 3 miles across at its widest part and extends back from the general line of the river about the same distance. It is about 14 miles wide where crossed by the railway bridge. The water is shallow over the greater part. The channel from deep water in the Columbia to deep water at the head of the bay has depths of from 9 to 14 feet over a distance of 2} miles, and over the remainder of the bay the depths probably range from 3 to 8 feet at low water. Average rise of tide is 7 feet. The bottom is composed principally of silt and sand. Its banks on the south and west sides are low and swampy. On the east there is the high rocky peninsula on which the city of Astoria is built. Its mouth opens to the north. In location it is well protected from prevailing storms. The two most considerable streams that empty into the bay are Youngs River and Lewis’ and Clarke River.

There are two bridges across Youngs Bay, the railroad bridge and the county wagon bridge. Both of these are pile trestles with steel draws. Railroad bridge has two clear openings, 130 feet, bottom chord about 20 feet above mean low water. County bridge has two clear openings, 120 feet, bottom chord about 20 feet above mean low water.

Youngs River rises in the Coast Mountains about the center of Clatsop County in the northwestern part of Oregon, flows in a north- westerly direction and empties into Youngs Bay. The total length of the stream is about 20 miles. About 6 miles above the bay the Klaskanine joins Youngs River. The twe branches are of about equal size. The head of navigation on Klaskanine branch is at the small town of Olney where the county road to Astoria crosses the river. On Youngs River navigation practically ends at the log booms of the Bremner Logging Co., about one-half mile above the forks. The streams above the forks for about 2 miles are about 100 to 200 feet wide, with depths varying from 3 to 11 feet at low water. The range of tide at Olney is about 6 feet. Several snags are in evidence. Bottom is mud and banks tide lands.

Below the forks, Youngs River gradually widens from about 200 to 1,200 feet where it joins the bay. The depths vary from 4 feet

on the bar about 2 = Be below the forks to 37 feet at the head of the bay. The range of tide over this section of the river is about 7 feet. The Bac is practically free from all obstructions. Bottom is fine silt and mud; banks tide lands.

A map is submitted herewith showing the river and bay. The shore line is taken from the map submitted with an examination

YOUNGS BAY AND RIVER, OREG. 9)

report of the river prepared in 1881. No material changes have taken place since that examination was made; the islands and sloughs, as well as the depths, are in general about the same to-day.

There are generally freshets of short duration during the winter months on both Youngs and Klaskanine Rivers. These affect the stream eels above the forks where they sometimes overflow the banks at an elevation of about 10 feet above low water. These freshets do not carry much silt, the upper reaches being rocky and heavily timbered.

The country contiguous to Youngs and Klaskanine Rivers is, when the timber is removed, essentially a dairying country. There are about 50 ranches in the valley, nearly all engaged in dairying. From most of these the cream and milk is taken by wagons over the country roads. The principal wealth of the country lies in the tributary timber, which is estimated at 10 to 15 billion feet. The Western Cooperage Co. is operating 4 or 5 miles of logging railroad up the Klaskanine, and, together with the Bremner Logging Co. sends out perhaps 20,000,000 feet b. m. of logs, valued at about $160,000, per annum.

It is believed that the commerce on Youngs River and Bay will consist of timber for many years. Cereal crops are not raised to any extent, as it is claimed climatic conditions are not suitable. Most of the farmers travel the country roads to Astoria, as they are about 4 miles shorter than the river and bay route.

The traffic in general freight and produce continues fairly regular throughout the year. Occasionally a stern-wheel boat takes in a load of hay late in the fall for use of dairy ranches for winter feed. The only boat now engaged in carrying general freight, dairy products, and passengers up Youngs River is the gasoline launch Teddy Roose- velt. She is about 50 feet long and draws about 43 feet. This boat makes one trip a day from Astoria to Olney and return, and carries, so the captain estimates, about 100 tons of freight in a month, 1,200 tons per annum. The only other boats which enter Youngs Bay and River are the towboats engaged in towing out logs from the booms of the Western Cooperage Co. and Bremner Douging Co. These boats take out one or two rafts a week, going in on the flood and coming out on the ebb tide. The tides would probably be used to a great extent even with a greater depth over the bar a short dis- tance below the booms. On reaching the bay the rafts are held to await the flood tide before towing 2 the Columbia to the mills.

No mills or factories are located on these waters, although it is possible and probable that some mills would be built on the bay should a deep-water channel be provided across the shallow water in Youngs Bay. The depth of the channel is now sufficient for present needs. in this connection reference is invited to the remarks of the Astoria Chamber of Commerce in a letter! dated October 24, 1912,

ith. peeling vessels of the Alaska fishing fleet use the upper end of Youngs Bay for anchorage when out of commission during the winter months. Pwo were anchored there at date of examination.

Besides the small wharf at Olney and two or three farmers’ landings, there are no wharves or docks located on Youngs Bay or River. There

1 Not printed.

6 YOUNGS BAY AND RIVER, OREG.

is no public space available for docks, and under present conditions none are eed te :

In connection with the establishment of harbor lines at Astoria Harbor, the Acting Secretary of War, on April 22, 1891, approved harbor lines in Youngs Bay and in the lower portions of Youngs and Lewis and Clark River as recommended by a board of engineer officers, whose report is printed on page 3388, Annual Report of the Chief of Engineers for 1891. ai pas . :

The only water power in the vicinity is at the falls on Y ie River above the head of navigation, where the Willamette Pulp & Paper Co. has had a pulp mill for over 20 years. The mill has not been operated for a long time. . io,

In compliance with the act of March 3, 1881, an examination was made of Youngs, Lewis and Clark, and Skipanon Rivers, entering into Youngs Bay, in the county of Clatsop, near mouth of Columbia River, Oreg., and the report is printed in Senate Document No. 112, Forty-seventh Congress, first session. a

In compliance with the act of August 11, 1888, an examination and survey were made of Youngs River and its tributary Klaskuine River (Klaskanine River), and the report, with map, is printed in House Document No. 69, Fifty-first Congress, first session. The report was favorable to improvement to the extent of removing snags and sunken logs at an estimated cost of $1,650. The act of Septem- ber 19, 1890, contained the following appropriation: Improving Youngs and Klaskuine Rivers in Oregon: To complete, $1,600. About $1,200 of this amount was expended during the winter of 1890 in removing snags, sunken logs, and overhanging trees as far up as the lower end of the cut-off, a distance of 7 miles, and also from the channel of the Klaskuine as far up as Kamms Wharf, a distance of about 2 miles. The balance was expended during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1896, in completing the improvement, and no further appropriation was recommended.

The act of September 19, 1890, also called for an examination of Youngs Bay channel from the ship channel of the Columbia River to the head of Youngs Bay, a distance of 14 miles, with a view to improving same by dredging, so as to secure a depth of 18 feet at low tide. The report is printed in House Document No. 67, Fifty-first Congress, second session. I fully concur in the following remarks of the district officer, Maj. Thomas H. Handbury, who made the report, the conditions remaining practically the same as they were 22 years ago:

Should the exigencies of commerce in this vicinity ever be such as to justify the necessary expense, a safe and convenient harbor of considerable magnitude can be made in these waters. At present the commerce of the locality is well served by vessels of a draft suitable to the present depths of water in the bay. There are no manufacturing establishments in the vicinity or natural products of the soil or evidence of outlay by private individuals that would seem to justify that the General Govern- ment expend here so large an amount of money as the dredging of this channel would involve. A large extent of the country in this vicinity, even to the hilltops, is laid out in town sites, and on paper these are liberally supplied with railroads, terminal facilities, dry docks, and other appliances necessary to the handling of a | and widely extended commerce. On the ground, however, I find no tangible deiehtes that capitalists of means have been induce to take hold of these enterprises. Until

there is such evidences it is believed the prospective commerce of the locality will not justify the expenditure.

YOUNGS BAY AND RIVER, OREG, 7 _ It appears that the item calling for this examination was inserted in the act at the request of the Representative in Congress from the district concerned with a view to securing a 25-foot channel at low tide from the Columbia River up to a point where the center line of sections 17 and 20, township 8 north, range 9 west, Willamette merid- ian, Oregon, crosses Youngs River. Reference to accompanying map will show that at this point the narrows of Youngs River or the head of Youngs Bay, there is at the present time a low-water depth of 29 feet, but that in the channel from the Columbia River through the bay for a distance of 24 miles the depth is only from 9 to 14 feet. Manifestly to secure a channel 25 feet deep through the bay from the Columbia River would necessitate the removal of a large quantity of material.

The waterway has no water aes capable of development in con- nection with its improvement for navigation, and while a large area of tide land could be reclaimed back of the established harbor lines by material dredged in deepening the channel, and it is probable that lumber and other wood manufacturing plants might be located on the bay if a deeper channel were piceniod, a project for a deeper channel should receive no further consideration without substantial cooperation on the part of local interests. A town-site company and a water front company have published prospectuses, with maps, showing extensive railroad water terminals and docks on both Pr of Youngs Bay, but this office has been unable to secure any expres- sion of a desire on the part of the property owners or of local com- mercial bodies to share with the United States the expense of any improvement. ; ;

In my opinion the existing channel in Youngs Bay and River is ample for the present and prospective demands of commerce, and any further improvement of the locality is not worthy of being undertaken by the General Government at this time.

J. F. McInbDoE, Major, Corps of Engineers. [First indorsement.] : Unrrep States ENGINEER OFFICE, NortTHerN Pactiric Division, - San Francisco, Cal., December 9, 1912. To the Curer or ENGINEERS, UNITED STATES ARMY: Concurring in the views expressed by the district officer. Tuos. H. Rees, Lieut. Col., Corps of Engineers, Division Engineer.

[For report of the Board of Engineers for Rivers and Harbors, see

3. p- 3.] ie

WAR DEPARTMENT CoRPS OF ENGineeRS USA

es Fea a Be ——Ic OC < 27 25 60 Bs eee as jot Pecks gm ee = = we ere ang

a3

ane

Lewis ond Clark Fiver

Vicinity Map

Scaue of Mites: °

1 ° 4

Herrington Pr

el +

YOUNGS BAY & RIVER ORE. PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION.

PREPARED UNDER DirecTION OF.

Mayor J.F M°|Inpdoe, Corps of Engrs. USA Gerald Bagnall Asst Engr. R.E Hickson Junior Engr

2 or ct*te or MiLes ,

Drown & Traced By SFMAREN Nov. i912

U.S. Engineer Office Portland Ore. Dec. 6, 1912.

APPROVED: is a, Bind: Engrs. USA

To accompony report of this date to the Chief of Engineers, USA :

is ea ee House Doc. No. /226 ; 62d Cong., 3d Sess.

>