Volume 21 . Number 1

Postgrad -

ASSOCIATION ALUMNI | SIR GEORGE WILLIAMS UNIVERSITY

April 1965

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TABLE OF CONTENTS:

Page 3 HENRY F. HALL BUILDING: PROGRESS REPORT No. lL Page 8 SIR GEORGE COMES OF AGE: First Graduate Courses Slated Page 11 GEORGIANS WILL BE SPORT-CONSCIOUS New Athletic Facilities in Building Planned Page 17 NEW COMMERCE CURRICULUM AT SGWU Page 18 POSTGRAD SPECIAL REPORT The Recommendations of the Parent Commission: EDUCATION BREAK- THROUGH IN QUEBEC Page 21 COLUCCI, CHAPUT AND CORE Page 24 OUR GRADS IN THE WORLD Notes from the Executive Director’s Office Page 26 FACULTY MEMBERS ON U.S. VIETNAM POLICY Page 28 DR. HARRY JOHNSON: NORRIS MEMORIAL LECTURES In Summary Page 30 SOCIOLOGY SUMMER SESSION PLANS Page 37 MELVIN BELLI SPEAKS TO UNDERGRADUATES

Page 40 ON AND OFF CAMPUS A Review of Activities

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Postgrad

VOLUME 21, NUMBER I SPRING ISSUE APRIL 1965

Editor-in-Chief STANLEY ASHER (Arts ’53, M.A.)

Financial Advisor

MELVIN ZWAIG (Com. ’61, C.A.) (of Riddell, Stead, Graham & Hutchison)

Advertising

ARCHIE E. FILTEAU

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS:

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE: President, Nicholas Grycan (Com. °50); Ist Vice President, R. G. Thompson (Arts °53); 2nd Vice President, R. C. Jonas (Arts 43); Secretary, John Hannan (Com. 53); Treasurer, Larry Nachshen (Com. °59); Past President, Gerald B. Miller (Arts °53).

BOARD: J. G. Bradley (Com. °52); Ernest Brown (Com. °50); Guy Dumesnil (Com. °47); Robert Gariepy (Com. °57); Thomas Hecht (Arts °50); M. Bistriskey (Arts °58);M. Langelier (Com. *48) ; Les Melia (Arts °58); Roland Picard (Se. °46); Mrs. Ruth Tunis (Sc. °46); Glenn Wood (Arts °45):; V. Yates (Arts 52); Mel Zwaig (Com. ’61).

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR: John M. Ferguson (Arts °50).

GRAD CLASS REPRESENTATIVE: Miss Helen

Bahr.

Published quarterly in April, June, September and December. Printed by Canadian Printing and Lithographing Co. Ltd., 5670 Chauveau St., Montreal 5. Authorized as Second Class Mail, Post Office Dept.. Ottawa.

Address all communications to: POSTGRAD, ASSOCIATION OF ALUMNI, SIR GEORGE WILLIAMS UNIVERSITY. 1441 DRUMMOND ST., MONTREAL 25, QUEBEC.

MEMBER AMERICAN ALUMNI COUNCIL.

HENRY F. HALL BUILDING ...

PROGRESS REPORT No. 1

Two months ahead of schedule

NEW BUILDING WILL HAVE INDOOR CAMPUS

By Stephen Phizicky (from the Georgian)

The Henry F. Hall building presently under construction and scheduled for completion in September of 1966, promises to be unique among Canadian University buildings, according to Associate Professor J. P. Petolas, Director of Development of the University.

Professor Petolas said that the Hall building has been designed to provide not only adequate facilities for the student body and staff, but also incorporates provisions for modification and moderniza- tion if these should this prove necessary.

The building situated on Burnside between Mackay and Crescent Sts., has been designed as a cube, ten stories high. It is intended to accommodate a maximum of 5,000 day and 10,000 evening Univer- sity students.

Among the facilities of the Hall building are 11 auditoria incorporating the latest built-in audio-visual teaching equipment as well as a completely equipped profes- sional-style theatre. There will be five complete floors of Jaboratories consisting of one for physics, two for chemistry, one for engineering and one for biology. Several laboratories will be devoted exclu- sively to research, a field in which Sir George has been sorely lacking.

One of the major additions to the Uni- versity will be greatly expanded library facilities. which will be located on the 5th and 6th floors of the Norris building. In addition, there will be several new libraries in the Hall building including a 20,000 volume Freshman library and a 30,000 volume Science library.

Another innovation is the ‘indoor campus” on the Ist mezzanine floor, running the length of the building. Other

student lounge facilities include a men’s common room. women’s Common room, mixed common room, recreational lounge (cards, chess, checkers, etc.) and reading lounge.

Greatly expanded Student Government facilities will also be provided as well as many rooms that will be used solely for meetings of university clubs and providing special equipment for those clubs that need it.

Mr. Petolas said that one of the major problems in the Hall building will be that of ‘Vertical transportation,’ that is, moving large numbers of students quickly and efficiently at peak periods between classes, on various floors, To that end it has been decided to use two sets of escalators (one up, one down) in addition to 2 elevators and a freight elevator. Es- calators were chosen for their speed and economy, as well as their ability to handle a large number of people in a short time. Naturally, there will be stairways for the energetic types.

There has been no provision made for sports, facilities, though these may be added at a later date.

Mr. Petolas went on to say that all these facilities have been designed in accordance with the specific needs of the University, and that he expects them to be more than adequate. He particularly stressed the fact that the Hall building has been designed from the “‘insideout’’ incorporating suggestions of the students and faculty and will be built around these rather than trying to work them in after- wards. Mr. Petolas said that although the university has no other definite plans for expansion, he feels that further growth is inevitable.

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M. C. ZWAIG NAMED CLEAN-UP CHAIRMAN

Melvin C. Zwaig, C.A. is Audit Supervisor at Riddell, Stead, Graham and Hutchison and is also a lecturer in account- ing, Extension Department, Commerce Faculty, McGill University.

Mr. Zwaig was graduated from Sir George with a Bachelor of Commerce degree in 1959 and was admitted as a member of the Quebec Institute of Chartered Accountants in October 1961.

He lives on Clanranald Avenue, Montreal, with his wife, Marsha, and two sons Arnold and Brian Jay.

Melvin C, Zwaig, C.A.

Dear Alumnus:

The overall University Campaign has raised $5,325,000.00 of its $7,000,000.00 objective. With the goal still distant, both the University and the Campaign Officials are looking to all avenues and all possibilities in an attempt to realize this outstanding amount.

To date, we, the members of the Association of Alumni, have not fulfilled our pledge. We have heard from only 30 per cent of our membership and have still to receive contributions of approximately $70,000.00 in order to achieve our $150,000.00 objective.

Both as graduates of the University and as members of the Association of Alumni we have an obligation to our Alma Mater.

What can you do to help realize our objective and liquidate our present obligation to the University? If you have not already been canvassed please complete and mail the pledge below. If you have been canvassed, volun- teer your help; we need your assistance on the second phase of the Alumni Division Campaign. You will receive a most cordial reception from John Ferguson and his charming staff. If you have already contributed, perhaps you can now increase your gift.

With a little thought and effort on the part of each one of us we will have no difficulty in reaching our goal. In order to enhance our standing as an Association of Alumni on the Campus Community we must help the University achieve its goal. Iam confident we will not fail.

Very truly yours, MELVIN C. ZWAIG, Clean-Up Chairman, Alumni Division

SIR GEORGE WILLIAMS UNIVERSITY BUILDING FUND |."

VISIONS 9h. 9 oF sialic geen wrbia ss wave As my/our share of the $7,000,000 required to complete financing of the Payment Herewith $23,900,000 program, including land, building and furnishings I/We subscribe: Total Gift

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Sir George Williams University Building Fund, 1441 Drummond St., Montreal 25, Que.

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SIR GEORGES COMES OF AGE

FIRST GRADUATE COURSES SLATED

Sir George Williams University will offer programmes leading to the degrees of Master of Arts in Art Education and the Master of Arts an English commencing in September, 1965, it has been announced today by the Principal, Robert C. Rae. The programmes will be available to day and evening students who have the required qualifications.

The programme leading to the Master of Arts degree in Art Education will feature a close integration of studio work and theoretical studies. It will involve research in specialized areas of art education. Stress will be placed on individual and critical approaches to the teaching of art and seminars will be held to integrate the various areas of study. Requirements for admission include the possession of a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree, or a Bachelor of Arts degree with some specialization in Fine Arts, or its equivalent and some experience in the teaching of art. The only other similar programme, in this field, available in Canada is offered at the University of British Columbia.

The Master of Arts in English programme will require course work and the submission of a thesis to be chosen in consultation with an advisory committee. The graduate course work will take place in seminars or through guided reading assignments. At least one of the courses will be of a cross-disciplinary or interlingual nature. The requirements for admission include an honours degree in English or its equivalent and a comprehensive entrance examination. The Master of Arts degree in English is considered to be basic to any graduate development

in an English-language university.

.... and more to

come

The announcement of these two pro- grammes of graduate study is the logical outcome of the evolution of Sir George Williams University and careful, intensive study and planning for several years. In evolving a total strategy of development, which included the conception of the Henry F. Hall building which is now under construction, the introduction of advanced studies in appropriate areas was foreseen. A Committee on Academic Development has been in existence for some time and this body developed a comprehensive statement to set the framework for graduate study. These recommendations were approved by the University Council and the Board of Governors. A Board of Graduate Studies, under the chairman- ship of Dr. Samuel Madras, Dean of Science, was established in June, 1964, to

Compliments of

implement the recommendations. After careful study and review the two graduate programmes announced today were ap- proved and subsequently endorsed by the University Council and the Board of Governors.

Two further programmes leading to the Master of Science degrees in Chemistry and Theoretical Physics had also been approved after rigorous examination of all the conditions necessary for the offering of advanced degrees. Although the Board of Graduate Studies is still satisfied that these programmes could have been effec- tively offered commencing in September, it has been decided to defer their introduc- tion until the full facilities of the Henry F. Hall building are available in the 1966-67 academic year.

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GEORGIANS WILL BE SPORT-CONSCIOUS

Special Report

ATHLETIC FACILITIES ARE COMING By D. John Lynn

As a result of the dramatic expansion going on at Sir George at the present, there has been a growing demand for more adequate sports facilities. Students, partic- ularly the athletes, have been complain- ing about present inadequacies and disad- vantages for some time.

The faculty has also recognized the need for expansion in this area, and the Athletic staff has been conducting surveys and making studies of other Canadian Uni- versity Athletic programs and facilities with a view to expansion.

The board of governors is fully aware of this problem, and has set up priorities for essential facilities. The first is a new and up-to-date library, and the second is a sports plant. Both are necessary to any university on the move, but here at Sir George inadequacies in these two areas are particularly severe.

With the construction of the H. F. Hall building we have established ourselves as a downtown University. The Library, the first priority item, will almost certainly be located downtown, and though there has been mention of sports facilities away from downtown along the projected subway route, present thinking favors a location in the present area.

If this is the case, it will be located within a ten-minute walk of the Hall and Norris buildings. As the program will be geared to provide for the needs of a pro- jected day school enrolment of 7,000 students, the sports centre would be accessible to the student who wants to participate in the intramural and recrea- tional programs.

Although plans are still in the develop- ment stage, the plant under consideration will havea gymnasium and pool, both with adequate seating, as well as handball courts and practice rooms for other sports and activities. It would also house the medical centre, equipment rooms. Athletic offices, and other essential areas.

Financing these facilities is another problem. At present, the Quebec govern- ment does not provide assistance to universities for the construction of athletic facilities. Although the Parent report, currently under consideration by govern- ment, strongly suggested a change in this policy, it would still require a cam- paign for funds. At present, Sir George is financing the Hall building with public subscriptions over a three-year period, and it would be difficult to embark on campaigns for library and Athletic facili- ties at the same time. And the prohibitive cost of land in the area suggests that these two ambitious projects would require a considerable sum of money.

Costs cannot be estimated until present plans near their final stages. We must not lose sight of the fact that, in order to stagger construction, these facilities might be built in a complex, rather than in a single building. With all of these considera- tions no deadline has been set, but the year currently being mentioned as a_ possible target date for the sports centre is 1970, certainly not before.

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PRISM, UNDERGRADUATE QUARTERLY, PRAISED “Prism, from Montreal’s Sir George

Williams University, is the only exciting

‘news’ since The University of British Columbia’s Raven 10 and The University of Toronto’s J ARGO ’58-59.”’

Mr. Victor Coleman in an article printed in the January edition of THe CANADIAN Forum, a Toronto-based magazine on Arts and Letters, heaped praises upon the literary publication of this University. Prism was selected from the work produc- ed in the past years on the Canadian University scene and was examplified as being outstanding in field. The critic chose the much-sought ’63-64 copies of Prism as spearheading this show of quality.

The fact that VoLtumME 63, with such eminent contributors as Gustafson, Birney, Bowering, and MacEwen is considered, in Mr. Coleman’s mind, as being collectively inferior to Prism, is indeed flattering.

“Magazines like Prism,” he concluded, “not to be confused with UBC's magazine of the same name, are entirely justified in that they produce a standard for students in ensuing years; a standard that can, as in Prism’s case, be looked up to and saluted at all turns.”

SGWU FORUM ON HISTORY OF MONTREAL

Sir George Williams University pre- sented a series of six lectures by the Com- mittee on Canadian Studies. Each year, the Committee proposes to offer an interdisciplinary study of a Canadian region or theme.

This year the topic was Montreal. Six lectures, each followed by a discussion period, were offered by specialists in various aspects of the city’s history and growth.

Subjects covered were: The history of

Vontreal, by Mr. Leslie Roberts, editor, writer and radio commentator; The Port of Montreal, by Mr. Brian Slack, Geog- raphy Department, Sir George Williams University; The Urban Montreal, by Prof. R. W. G. Bryant, Institut d’ Urbanisme, University of Mont- real; Ethnic Patterns in Montreal, by Vabbé Norbert Lacoste, Sociology De- partment, University of Montreal;; Civic administration of Montreal, by Mr. Thom- as Plunkett, Municipal Affairs Consul- tant; and Architecture of Montreal, by Prof. J. Bland, Director, School of Archi- tecture, McGill University.

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TRIMESTER PLAN AT GUELPH?

Dr. J. D. MacLachlan, President of the University of Guelph, has announced that the University is interested in the year- round campus operation under the trimes- ter system. It is anticipated that the trimester programme will be offered in the Arts and Science courses of Wellington College which opens its doors in 1965. Special study committees are considering the plan and a decision is expected to be made by the University Senate in De- cember.

Simon Fraser University has already announced that it will operate under the trimester plan when classes start in 1965.

ON GRADUATES STUDIES...

Two shelves and a dean

Your neighborhood, wherever it is, is likely soon to be boasting and boosting a new university, and you will be expected to take an intelligent interest in its develop- ment as it grows, from the stage of opening its library with a shelf of textbooks and an old copy of Tre, to the stage of acquiring a second shelf of books and appointing a Dean of Graduate Studies.—/H. Northrop Frye. Principal, Victoria College.

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1965 PRODUCTION OF GEORGIAN PLAYERS

A hard look at the easy life was the theme of this year’s major production by the Georgian Players of Sir George Wil- liams University. The work was Opera For a 2-Car Garage, an original play with songs by Montreal playwright Tevia Abrams, Music was arranged, composed and adapted by Max Layton, a young Montrealer who has sung in coffee houses in Canada and the United States. It was presented January 29 and 30 in Birks Hall of the University.

The idea for the play was suggested by Victor Knight, well known theatre per- sonality, and director of the production. Based loosely on John Gay’s The Beggar’s Opera and Bertholt Brecht’s The Three Penny Opera, the new play is a scandalous glimpse into mid-century corporate life.

The plot concerns the nationwide Indoor Games Unlimited, an organization deyoted to pleasurable pursuits, Peachum, the profiteering founder and Chairman of the Board, has been dipping his hands into the profits for many years. As the play opens, this dynamic senior executive is beginning to feel the reins of power slipping out of his grip. His daughter Polly, a sweet

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NEW COMMERCE CURRICULUM

The University Council, at a recent meeting, has approved an en- tirely new approach to education for business. Dean Lewis N. Greer and his colleagues, after intensified research, reached the conclusion arrived at by many research scholars of Business Education. The underlying philoso-

phy may be summarized as follows:

“Collegiate business education, largely a product of the twentieth century, is today a restless and uncertain giant in the halls of higher educa- tion. It enrolls considerably more male students than either engineering or mathematics and the natural sciences combined. In 1957-58, approxi- mately one of every six degrees granted in the United States was in busi-

ness education.”

Our analysis also indicates four propo- sitions that should be considered in under- taking the development of a program of “Education for Business”. These are:

(1) Business education should educate for the whole career, and not primarily for the first job.

(2) It should view the practice of business professionally, in the sense of relating it to what we have in the way of relevant, systematic bodies of knowledge.

(3) It should emphasize the development of basic problem solving and organiz- ational skills and socially construc- tive attitudes, rather than memoriza- tion of facts or training in routine skills.

(4) It should recognize that businesses in the decades ahead will need a higher order of analytical ability, a more sophisticated command of analytical tools, a greater degree of organiza- tional skill, and a wider capacity to cope with the external environment of business than has been true in the past.

Before considering the foundation of our new curriculum, it is desirable to stress that the program reflects the appreciation of the view that, although the process of education for business may commence formally through a University, this is only the beginning of a lifetime of accumulating experience. It is not intended or possible that the program should provide a lifetime inventory of skills, attitudes and knowl- edge. It is specifically acknowledged that those interested in excelling in the business community will be involved in a lifetime educational process. This will be a conti- nuous program of intellectual development through general reading, specific business reading, formal education as individual needs become evident, and possible full time study in an executive development program offered in conjunction with a University.

Therefore, the objective of our program is education for a creative role in business. It is a vocational objective as is education for engineering, law, medicine, etc. It is our intention that our objective be accom- plished by structuring a program which is

multi-disciplinary, integrative and taught by a liberally educated faculty.

The new course of study is a twenty- three credit curriculum and it may be divided into the following groupings:

(1) Study in certain basic disciplines and tool subjects (notably literature and language skills, mathematics and statistics, psychology and sociology, legal institutions, economics and accounting).

(2) Study of the application of these disciplines and tools to a core of broad functional aspects of the firm (finance, marketing, production and human resources).

(3) a. Selected area of concentration (Honours economics; economics,

accounting, finance, marketing and administration. )

OR

b. A selection of five courses by the student from any Faculty.

(4) The Business Policy course which attempts to integrate the experience obtained in the multi-disciplinary study of business.

French Language

The Business Community, as well as Governments, now express a preference for University graduates that are bilingual. We, therefore, advise all students to take advantage of the opportunities available during their years at this University to ensure that they are bilingual when they present themselves for employment upon graduation.

(Continued on page 39)

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A POSTGRAD SPECIAL REPORT:

EDUCATION BREAKTHROUGH IN QUEBEC

THE PARENT COMMISSION RECOMMENDS...

(Translated by Rosalind J. Murray)

(From University Affairs, December, 1964)

Msgr. Alphonse-Marie Parent, P.A., Chair- man of the Royal Commission of Inquiry on Education in the Province of Quebec.

On March 24, 1961, the Government of the Province of Quebec established a Royal Commission of Inquiry on Education in the Province, and appointed the Commis- sion’s nine members on April 21. The Commission, which began its work on May 25 of the same year, received more than 300 briefs during public hearings held between November 1961 and July 1962 in seven or eight cities of the Province. Later in 1962 it visited various educational institutions and organizations at all levels in the other Canadian provinces and in the United States. In January and February 1963, the Commission traveled to England, Scotland, France, Switzerland, Belgium, Holland, Germany, the Scandinavian countries, Moscow and Kiev.

Upon its return the Commission released the first section of its report which, one year later, led to the establishment of a Ministry of Education and a Superior Council of Education, assisted by a Roman Catholic Committee and a Protestant Committee as well as by four Commis- sions representing the different educational levels.

After more than 400 interviews and discussions, the Commission has just presented to the Government the second volume of its report, which deals with the structure and levels of the educational system. It consists of 400 pages and ten chapters, the seventh of which is devoted to higher education. The third volume of the report, soon to be released, will con- sider courses of study. The fourth will deal chiefly with local and regional school boards as well as the financing of educa- tion. The entire report will consist of approximately 1,200 pages.

Educational levels

One of the main concerns of the Com- mission was to define higher education more clearly and, by recommending the

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co-ordination of higher education through- out the Province, to ensure parallel struc- ture for English-language and French- language institutions.

The Commission thus proposes that, henceforth, higher education be regarded as all studies above the diploma of the 13th year, and that the latter be awarded upon completion of six years’ elementary, five years’ secondary and two years’ post- secondary studies. Instruction at the 12th- and 13th-year levels will be the responsi- bility of a new type of institution called the ‘‘institute’’ and not that of the university. At the institute, students will prepare for university entrance (pre- university programme) or for employment (vocational programme).

The 13th-year diploma or its equivalent will be required for admission to university. Depending upon the field of specialization, three or four years’ study will lead to a first degree, and two additional years to a second degree. Three years of study after a first degree will be required for a doc- torate.

In French-language as well as English- language universities, studies at the same level and of identical duration will lead to equivalent degrees. The length of these programmes of study will be decided upon by the Ministry of Education in consulta- tion with the heads of the universities and the Superior Council of Education.

At present, certain faculties of French- language as well as English-language uni- versities require a baccalaureate for admis- sion; others do not. Moreover, the bacca- laureate conferred by French-language institutions is not equivalent to the B.A. conferred by English-language institutions. To eliminate this anomaly and in fairness to all students, the Commission recom- mends that all faculties of all universities in the Province of Quebec admit their students after completion of the 13th year. In this way, both English-language and French-language students, at the age of 22 or 23, may obtain a first degree after the 16th or 17th year of study. Invariably, the degree will represent the culmination of

university training designed to prepare for careers.

New university institutions

The Commission’s terms of reference charged it with the task of studying the necessity and advisability of creating new universities, in the face of a rapidly grow- ing student population and in considera- tion of the geographic size of the Province. Although it decided not to propose the early establishment of new universities having the power to confer degrees to and including the doctorate, the Commission does, however, recommend the creation of new universities with limited charters, that is, with the authority to offer instruc- tion to the first degree and with the power to confer that degree. It is proposed that two such universities be established imme- diately in Montreal, one French-language and one for the English-speaking Catho- lics.

In addition, the Commission recom- mends that centres of university study be established in three paired regions of the Province : the St. Maurice and Nicolet; the Saguenay and Lake St. John; the Lower Saint Lawrence and Gaspé.

The Commission specifies the criteria which must be observed in setting up new universities and centres of university study. They deal with the required number of students, qualifications of teachers, and laboratory and library facilities. From a pedagogical point of view the centres of university study will be associated with parent universities, and instruction will be limited to one or two years of the first- degree course. Students may proceed from these centres to full-fledged universities to complete the first degree.

It is suggested that the Commission for Higher Education appoint a committee, for a five-year term, to assist the new uni- versities during their period of organiza- tion. Similarly, the centres of university study would be assisted by committees named by their parent universities.

The Royal Commission suggests, in this second volume of its report, that the Com- mission for Higher Education, in co- operation with the Division of Planning of the Ministry of Education, follow closely the evolution of higher education in the

(Continued on page 22)

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COLUCCI, CHAPUT and CORE

Our Man at Large

A GEORGIAN REPORTS (by Joe Colucci) O CANADA

Mr. Edmund Wilson, in his masterful survey of the Canadian zeitgeist, in ‘‘The New Yorker’’, noted that Marcel Chaput, separatist leader, used the hunger